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ESL Grants Newsletter Horizon 2020 :Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions

 

Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (MSCA)

Career funding for mobile researchers

This programme aims to support researchers at different stages of their career. MSCA are open to all domains of research and innovation, from basic research to market take-up and innovation services.

Mobility is a key requirement for the different actions. There are calls for proposals open to individual researchers and innovation staff, as well as to universities, research institutions, businesses (SMEs and large industry) and other socio-economic players from all countries. MSCA are open to men and women alike, without regard to the physical age of the applicant.

There are 4 funding schemes foreseen: 

  • Individual Fellowships (IF)
  • Innovation Training Networks (ITN)
  • Research and Innovation Staff Exchange Scheme (RISE)
  • Cofunding of existing or new PhD and postdoc fellowship programmes (COFUND)
  • plus the Researcher’s Night (NIGHT).

The exact rules and eligibility criteria for each call are outlined in the respective documents to be found on the Research Participant Portal of the European Commission.

As mobility is a key element in all MSCA, researchers only receive funding if they move from one country to another. The assigned budget and success rates vary from call to call. In general, funding for the individual researcher depends on the researcher’s experience: For example, in 2013 an early stage researcher (less than 4 years' research experience and without PhD) received a living allowance of up to €38 000/year; an experienced researcher (more than 4 years' research experience or with PhD) up to €58 500/year; and a very experienced researcher (more than 10 years' research experience) up to €87 500/year. These amounts vary according to the country correction coefficients and are combined with various other allowances.

 

 

I International Incoming Fellowships (IIF)

this overview will help you identify Marie curie Actions that best corresponded to your profile

 

Organisation only

Individual together with an Organisation

You have less than 4 years1 research experience
(e.g. you are doing your PhD) (Early stage researcher)

 

 

 

You have more than 4 years research experience or you have a doctoral degree (PhD)
(Experienced researcher)

 

 

 

 

Managerial and technical staff

 

 

 

 

 

II International Outgoing Fellowships (IOF)

You can learn a great deal by carrying out your research in another part of the world. The IOF offers opportunities to do research outside Europe and then to return.

What is an IOF?
The International Outgoing Fellowship (IOF) aims to reinforce the international dimension of the career of European
experienced researchers by giving them the opportunity to be trained and acquire new knowledge in a third country high level research organisation. Subsequently, these researchers will return with the acquired knowledge and experience to a European organisation, in a Member State or an Associated Country. Researchers must be nationals of a Member State or an Associated Country.

The IOF consists of a financial support to 2-phases mobility projects:
The 1st phase has duration of about 24 months in a partner organisation in a third country.
The 2nd phase of the project is to be spent in a return host organisation in a Member State or an Associated Country. This phase of reintegration has duration of 12 months and is mandatory. As the other Marie Curie Actions, the IOF follows a bottom-up approach, e.g. the research topic is freely chosen by the researcher in collaboration with the return host organization with a view to completing his/her expertise. The IOF is crosscutting, e.g. any scientific field can be funded.

What is a “third country”?
A third country is a country which is neither an EU Member State nor an Associated Country to FP7, e.g.: Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Egypt, Japan, South Africa, Venezuela USA, etc.

What is funded in an IOF?
The financial support for an IOF takes the form of a grant covering up to 100% of the budget. It includes in particular a yearly gross living allowance for an experienced researcher of € 58’500 and a mobility allowance. Experienced researcher: either in possession of a PhD or with at least 4 years of research experience fulltime.
Its indicative budget is about €40 mio.

What is the life cycle of an IOF?
How long does it take from the moment you write your proposal until the moment your project can finally start (in case you get funded by the European Commission)?Count roughly 10-12 months before starting your project:
Stage 1: After the Call for an IOF has been published, the researcher and the return host organisation have 3 months to prepare and submit a proposal until the deadline.
Stage 2 : A panel of experts will evaluate the proposals (2-3 months)
Stage 3: Applicants whose proposals have been successfully evaluated in Stage 2 will be invited by the EC to negotiate (2-3 months)
Stage 4 : If the negotiation with the EC has been successful, it will take another 2-3 months to prepare the contract
Stage 5: 1st phase of the project at the partner institution of a duration of 24 months
Stage 6: 2nd phase of the project at the return host institution for a period of 12 months.

 

III Intra-European Fellowships (IEF)

What is an Intra-European Fellowship?
The Intra-European Fellowship (IEF) aims to help
experienced researchers (i.e. in possession of PhD or with at least 4 years of research experience full time) enhance their career by providing financial support for an individual project that will get funded for a period of 12 to 24 months. The goal is to support researchers in attaining a leading independent position, e.g. principal investigator, professor or other senior position in education or enterprise. The IEF may also assist researchers to resume a career in research after a break. As the other Marie Curie Actions, the rule of mobility is mandatory in an IEF: applicants can be of any nationality, but they must move from an EU Member State (MS) or an Associated Country (AC) to another MS or AC. The IEF follows a bottom-up approach, e.g., the research topic is freely chosen by the researcher in collaboration with the host institution. The IEF is cross-cutting, e.g. any scientific field can be funded.

Why should you go for an IEF?

  1. Income yearly gross living allowance of € 58’500 (+mobility allowance) for an experienced researcher
  2. Prestige IEF is highly competitive and obtaining one complements any CV
  3. Independence the fellow researcher (applicant)strongly influences the fellowship topic and destination
  4. Mobility from and to an EU Member State or Associated Country

What is funded in an IEF?
The financial support for an IEF takes the form of a grant covering up to 100% of the budget. It includes in particular a yearly gross living allowance for an experienced researcher of €58’500 + allowances. Experienced researcher: either in possession of a PhD or with at least 4 years of research experience.
Its indicative budget is about €110 mio.

What is the life cycle of an IEF?
How long does it take from the moment you write your proposal until the moment your project can finally start (in case you get funded by the European Commission)? Count roughly 10-12 months:
Stage 1: After the Call for an IEF has been published, the researcher and the host organization have 3 months to prepare and submit a proposal until the deadline.
Stage 2 : A panel of experts will evaluate the proposals (3 months)
Stage 3: Applicants whose proposals have been successfully evaluated in Stage 2 will be invited by the EC to negotiate (2-3 months)
Stage 4 : If the negotiation with the EC has been successful, it will take another 2-3 months to prepare the contract
Stage 5: Start of the project, funded for a period of 12 to 24 months

 

Tips for a successful proposal

Demonstrate in as many ways as possible that you are the best and promising European researcher in your area.
Explain the contribution that your project is expected to make. Your project must be innovative and original.
Outline the benefit that will be gained from undertaking the project at the Community level and how it will contribute to enhance the European scientific excellence.
Demonstrate the expertise of the partner organisation and the return host institution as well as the expertise of the scientific in charge in the field of research you want to explore
Describe how this project will contribute to your own career
Respect the maximum length of the proposal

Do not miss the Call deadline!

 

AWARDS AND PRIZES

2010 Disseration Prize-winner of the Association of Alumni and Friends of the ISDC (AiSDC) for a high academic quality an original piece of research in the area of comparative law.: Mrs Hélène van Lith, for her doctoral thesis : « International Jurisdiction and Commercial Litigation : Uniform Rules for Contract Disputes », The Hague : T.M.C. Asser, 2009, 585 p.   


The Hall of Fame lists the top researchers who have received prestigious awards, grants, and prizes for their scientific achievements during their time at the Erasmus School of Law.

 

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